Wyandot County Organic Wapsie Valley Heirloom Corn

Corn, a core staple food crop among the native peoples of Mesoamerica, dates back more than 6000 years. This beautiful heirloom, with a rich mix of yellow, red, orange, and purple, delight the eye and indicate Wapsie's rich flavor and nutritive qualities. Its roots can be traced to Iowa in the mid 1800s. Ed Snavely and Tom Klein, both Ohio organic farmers, have each told us that they have placed hybrid corn on one end of the pig run, and Wapsie Valley on the other, then let the pigs in. Again and again, the pigs don’t even look at the hybrid corn until every kernel of Wapsie is gone. "They know what’s good for them!" Our Organic Wapsie Valley Heirloom Corn (non-gluten), is grown at Tom & Mary Klein and Sons Organic Farm. The Kleins never use GMO varieties, as is required to be Certified Organic.


Wyandot County Organic Red Fife Heirloom Wheat

Most varieties of red spring wheat, including Marquis, owe their ancestry to Red Fife, a landrace variety, which was the baking and milling industries standard of 'wheat' from 1860 to 1900. Red Fife can grow from three to five feet tall, and is thought to have originated in what is now Western Ukraine, where it was called, Chervona Vusata. Called "Red" because of its color when fully ripe and "Fife" after David Fife, the Ontario farmer who, in 1842, was the first to grow it in North America. For most of the twentieth century, it was only grown in plant breeders’ seed collections. Then Sharon Rempel, who became known as the godmother of Red Fife wheat, planted a "Living Museum of Wheat" in Keremeos B.C. Canada and by the 1990s, enough seed was available to grow it out on several farms. Our organic Red Fife Wheat is grown at Tom & Mary Klein and Sons Organic Farm. The Kleins never use GMO varieties, as is required to be Certified Organic.


Marion County Oberkülmer Spelt

Oberkülmer Spelt From mysterious origins to mystical healing powers, spelt claims a history as rich as its unmistakable sweet, buttery, nutty flavor. Spelt, also known as “Dinkel” or German wheat, developed through the spontaneous crossing of the wild goat grasses "Aegilops squarrosa" and Emmer (an ancient Egyptian grain) between 6000 and 5000 years before the Christian Era. This wilder crop boasts a very impressive lineup of nutritive qualities. In ancient Greek mythology, spelt was given to the people by the goddess Demeter, and in the 12th century, Hildegaard von Bingen, the first nutritionist in Germany, called spelt the best grain of all, and prescribed it for everyday health maintenance and as the first medicine to a very wide range of ailments and conditions. Spelt contains more protein, fats and crude fibre than wheat and also has large amounts of Vitamin B17 (anti-carcinoma). It also contains special carbohydrates which play a decisive role in blood clotting and stimulate the body’s immune system so as to increase its resistance to infection. Shagbark’s Oberkülmer Spelt is grown at the Mark Beaver Organic Farm. The Beavers never use GMO varieties, as is required to be Certified Organic.


Marion County Organic Buckwheat

Non-Gluten

Originally cultivated on the Tibetan Plateau around 6000 BC, buckwheat is the world’s highest elevation domesticate. It is not actually wheat, or a grain at all. It is related to rhubarb and sorrel, but since its seeds are eaten like grain, it is called a pseudocereal. A distinctive, earthy-sweet flavor accompanies the exceptionally complete protein composition of buckwheat. Favored in Macrobiotic diet practice, buckwheat single-handedly provides the nutritional balance of eating beans and grains together in a meal, and it is also the most alkalizing of all grain-type foods. Before corn was brought to Europe, Roman soldiers ate polenta made from buckwheat (or barley). It has been an important staple all over the world, since its emergence from Southeast Asia. Buckwheat is also an excellent cover crop for farms, and it’s great for bees!

Grown at the Mark Beaver Organic Farm. Beavers never use GMO varieties, as is required to be Certified Organic.


Shelby County Organic Corn

Corn, a core staple food crop among the native peoples of Mesoamerica, dates back more than 6000 years. The Clinehens chose the most flavorful organic hybrid seed for our corn tortillas, masa, chips, and crackers. This variety is chosen for the best performance in the ancient Mayan process of Nixtamal, which we use for making our Original Corn Tortilla Chips, our Black Bean & Corn Tortilla Chips, our Corn Cracker Minis, and our Fresh Corn Tortillas. Nixtamal creates the great flavor that's integral to corn tortillas and makes B vitamins in corn bioavailable.

Our organic hybrid corn is grown by Chris Clinehens his daughter, Ginger, and his wife, Kim, at Clinehens Organic Farm in Shelby County, Ohio. The Clinehens never use GMO varieties, as is required to be Certified Organic.


Morgan County Heirloom Popcorn

A full kernel heirloom, this unnamed Heirloom Popcorn has been saved for generations, by the Hershberger’s extended family, who grow it using horse drawn equipment, on the Hershberger Family Farms in Morgan County, Ohio.


Defiance County Organic Dry Beans

Shagbark dry bean varieties have been at the heart of indigenous foodways in the western hemisphere where they are native and have been cultivated for thousands of years. Shagbark’s organic dry beans are fresh from this years harvest, rather than stored for years on warehouse shelves, so they yield the benefits of a shorter cooking time, richer flavor, and superior texture.

Organic Black Beans (Black Turtle Beans)

Organic Black Beans have been the heart of native foodways of North, South, and Central America, loaded with protein, fiber, magnesium, and antioxidants. The black bean is a small, shiny variety of Phaseolus vulgaris, especially popular in Latin American cuisine, and can also be found in Cajun and Creole cuisines of south Louisiana. Black beans are native to the Americas. The black turtle bean has a dense, meaty texture, which makes it popular in vegetarian dishes, such as frijoles negros and the Mexican-American black bean burrito. It is a very popular bean in various regions of Brazil, and is used in the national dish, feijoada. It is also a main ingredient of Moros y Cristianos in Cuba, and is served in almost all of Latin America, as well as many Hispanic enclaves in the United States.

A field of black turtle bean plants stands out among the ubiquitous soybean, primarily because of their distinctive purple flowers. Grown at Andrews Organics Farm in Defiance County, Ohio, Shagbark’s organic black beans are fresh from this years harvest, rather than stored for years on warehouse shelves, so they yield the benefits of a shorter cooking time, richer flavor, and superior texture.

Organic Pinto Beans

A nutrient-dense legume, the pinto bean contains many essential nutrients and is very low in saturated fat. It is a good source of protein, phosphorus and manganese, and very high in dietary fiber and folate. Rice and pinto beans served with cornbread or corn tortillas are often a staple meal where meat is unavailable, their combined amino acids forming a complete protein source.

In Spanish, they are called frijol pinto ([fri.ˈxol ˈpin.to]), literally "speckled bean", and in South America it is known as the poroto frutilla, literally "strawberry bean". The pinto was also one of the first beans to be mechanically processed and has been used widely in Appalachia and in the South where it was once a staple, especially during the winter months. Some organizations and churches in rural areas still sponsor "pinto bean suppers" for social gatherings and fundraisers. The Pinto is known scientifically as Phaseolus vulgaris.

Grown for us at Andrews Organics Farm in Defiance County, Ohio, Shagbark’s organic pinto beans are fresh from this years harvest, rather than stored for years on warehouse shelves, so they yield the benefits of a shorter cooking time, richer flavor, and superior texture.